Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Alfred Nobel



For those that don’t know who this is, Alfred Nobel was a Swedish Industrialist who went on to invent the Nobel patent detonator (Dynamite).

In one of his many biographies, there is a story of how a newspaper mistakenly assumed that Alfred had passed away (when in actuality it was his brother). The newspaper went on to publish an obituary of Nobel that focused on the fact that he was the one responsible behind the creation of the most destructive power of the century playing a significant factor in several deaths.

After reading his own obituary, Nobel decided that he did not want to be remembered in a negative light, therefore he committed to improving humanity by creating the Nobel Peace Prize that annually awards achievements in physics, literature, physiology, medicine, international piece and chemistry. It has been for some time considered the world’s most prestigious and scholarly of awards.

After stumbling upon this story, it made me want to ask the question: If you were to read your own obituary, how do you think it would make you feel?

Would you feel like you have accomplished some or all that you have set out to do?
Would you be happy?
Would you be sad?
Would you be angry?
Would you wish you had done things differently?
Would you feel regret?

If you were to have access to your obituary, would you change your current approach to life and how you operate on a daily basis with regards to work, relationships, family, finances, health?...If you say yes, how would you go about it?


We as individuals are the one’s making the decisions and performing the actions that will eventually lay the foundation and dictate what is to be written in our own obituary at some point in time.

If we want to be remembered in a positive light, leave a lasting legacy and make a positive impact on life, it starts with making the necessary changes along the process to make all of our goals, objectives and visions come to fruition.

Alfred Nobel had to opportunity to change his legacy. We can learn from his experience and do the same.

Written by Jason Sarai.

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